Table of Contents

TABLE OF CONTENTS
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
Downloading plans
Flight of whirligigs
Free plans all metal hub
Free plans Whirligig Stand
Free plans Whirligig #43
Free plans Whirligig #46
Free plans Whirligig #57
Gears for whirligigs
Painting your whirligig
Translate

_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

10.18.2008

Whirligig #43 Free Plans

Chuck Dunbar's
Whirligig Design & Development
Whirligig #43 Complete Plans


Watch it.

___________________________________________________________


Use Google translate
Utilisez Google Translate
Utilizar Google Translate
Utilizza Google Translate
Mit Google Translate
Uzyj Google Translate
Use o Google Translate

___________________________________________________________

Chuck Dunbar's
Whirligig Design & Development
Whirligig #43

Materials List

___________________________________________________________

Chuck Dunbar's
Whirligig Design & Development
Whirligig #43
Special Tools


  1. 9 " Band saw with a 1/8" blade to cut non ferrous metals
  2. Table saw
  3. Router
  4. Home made router table (http://www.woodstore.net/porotapl.html)
  5. General wheel and circle cutter, part #06

___________________________________________________________

Chuck Dunbar's
Whirligig Design & Development
Whirligig #43
Plans


Read all the directions through before starting.
___________________________________________________________

Chuck Dunbar's
Whirligig Design & Development
Whirligig # 43
Blade - step 1 & 1.5






___________________________________________________________

Chuck Dunbar's
Whirligig Design & Development
Whirligig # 43
Blade - step 2


  1. Do the operations below on both blades at the same time. It is easier to lay out all the dimensions before cutting.)
  2. Cut the aluminum to a square about 9 3/4".
  3. Establish a centerline with a scribe.
  4. Lay out the two circles that define the blade shape on the centerline.
  5. Locate the centers for the four mounting holes and the hole where the centerline and the inside circle cross.
  6. Drill the mounting holes and the centerline hole.
  7. Cut the two circles and two arcs on a small band saw (I use a Delta 9" band saw with a 9" throat.) You will need a circle jig for this procedure. Usually the jig uses a small nail to center the work at the desired radius. At the four center points, drill holes of a diameter to allow a close fit over the nail. See step 2 for the location of guide holes for the two arcs.
  8. Cut the outside circle first.
  9. Carefully cut a path up the centerline to the hole at the intersection of the inside circle and centerline. This hole will allow you to turn the work 90 degrees and mount it on your circle jig to cut the inside circle.
  10. Cut the inside circle.

___________________________________________________________

Chuck Dunbar's
Whirligig Design & Development
Whirligig # 43
Blade - step 3



  1. Cut the two arcs.
  2. Smooth the band saw cuts.
___________________________________________________________

Chuck Dunbar's
Whirligig Design & Development
Whirligig # 43
Blade - step 4



  1. Lay out the guidelines for bending the ends of the blade.
  2. Bend each end 30 degrees in the opposite direction. The distance between the ends should be 3/4".
  3. On the second blade, the bends must be the mirror image of the first blade so that it will move in the opposite direction in a breeze.


___________________________________________________________

Chuck Dunbar's
Whirligig Design & Development
Whirligig # 43
Hub - step 1

  1. Cut to size. (Make the Mast Axle Holder at the same time to avoid setting up the tools twice.)
  2. Mark the centerline on the block for later reference. Lay out the blade mounting holes, and drill on a drill press. (I use a brad point drill for accuracy.)
___________________________________________________________

Chuck Dunbar's
Whirligig Design & Development
Whirligig # 43
Hub - step 2

  1. Lay out the center of the block, and drill a pilot hole. It is important to be precise as possible, because an off center blade is difficult to balance.
___________________________________________________________

Chuck Dunbar's
Whirligig Design & Development
Whirligig # 43
Hub - step 3

  1. The bearing must fit snugly in the hole. Drill a test hole in a wood scrap with a 5/8 diameter paddle bit. Try the bearing. If the hole is too large, reduce the bit diameter on a whetstone or sandpaper. If the hole is too small, try another paddle bit brand.
  2. Set the depth of the paddle bit hole to be 3/16”. Drill the holes in the hubs.
___________________________________________________________

Chuck Dunbar's
Whirligig Design & Development
Whirligig # 43

Hub - step 4

  1. This step requires a circle cutter from General Tools (http://www.generaltools.com/Products/Wheel-and-Circle-Cutter__06.aspx). If you do not already own a circle cutter, get “Wheel and Circle Cutter, part #06.” This cutter comes with a reversible blade that leaves scrap waste on the inside of the cut, “Circle” option, or on the outside, “Wheel” option. If you have a standard General Tool circle cutter, it will still work. It is harder to set the exact dimension and requires an extra step to cut away the waste left on the disk. Be aware that the maximum safe speed is 500 revolutions per minute.
  2. Carefully center the pilot bit of the circle cutter in the hole left from the paddle bit operation.
  3. Cut a little more than half way through the wood.
  4. Turn the piece over and cut from the opposite side.
  5. (If you have waste left on the disk, use the band saw to cut away most of the waste freehand. Then, using a drum sander mounted on a drill press and the disk mounted on 1/4” diameter peg in a jig clamped the drill press table, sand away the remaining waste.)
  6. On a drill press pipe jig (a 90-degree vee cut into a 2 x 4 length of wood), drill the 1/4” diameter holes to hold the counter balance rods.
  7. Ream out the 1/4” diameter hole left from the circle cutter to 3/8” diameter. If it is not perfectly centered, that is all right.
  8. The Axle only needs to clear the side of the hole.

___________________________________________________________

Chuck Dunbar's
Whirligig Design & Development
Whirligig # 43
Hub - step 5

  1. Check the location of the retaining pin holes. Make sure the hole location is directly above the center of the Counter Balance Rod holes. Make an adjustment if necessary in the retaining pin holes location.
  2. Insert Counter Balance Rods in the holes. Make certain the rods go all the way to the bottom of the holes. If you need to rub the end of the rods with soap to make it easier to push them into the hole.
  3. Drill the holes for the retaining pins with the rods in place. Identify each rod with the hole it goes in. (With an awl or ice pick, make small marks in the wood near the hole. Wrap the rod with tape and mark it to allow you to match it to its hole.) It is not possible to drill the retaining pin holes accurately enough to allow the rods to be interchangeable.
___________________________________________________________


Chuck Dunbar's
Whirligig Design & Development
Whirligig # 43
Mast Axle Holder - step 1



  1. Cut to size. (Make the Hubs at the same time to avoid setting up the tools twice.)
___________________________________________________________


Chuck Dunbar's
Whirligig Design & Development
Whirligig # 43
Mast Axle Holder - step 2

  1. Locate and drill the holes.
___________________________________________________________


Chuck Dunbar's
Whirligig Design & Development
Whirligig # 43
Mast Axle Holder - step 3

  1. Drill the 1/4” diameter hole for the Axle.
  2. Drill the 1/8” diameter retaining pin hole while the axle is in place.
___________________________________________________________


Chuck Dunbar's
Whirligig Design & Development
Whirligig # 43
Mast Axle Holder - step 4




  1. Do this step at the same time as Hub - step 4.
  2. Fill the hole left by the circle cutter with scrap wood.
___________________________________________________________


Chuck Dunbar's
Whirligig Design & Development
Whirligig # 43
Mast - step 1



  1. Cut the mast to its overall dimension
___________________________________________________________

Chuck Dunbar's
Whirligig Design & Development
Whirligig # 43
Mast - step 2

  1. Locate and drill the two holes for the Mast Axle Holder. These holes are purposely a little larger to allow for an adjustment when assembling.
  2. Rout as shown. This is the front of the mast.
___________________________________________________________

Chuck Dunbar's
Whirligig Design & Development
Whirligig # 43
Mast - step 3

  1. Cut away the space for the Mast Axle Holder. I make several passes with a dado blade. If the surface is not perfectly smooth, it does not matter. The Mast Axle Holder will hide the surface.
___________________________________________________________

Chuck Dunbar's
Whirligig Design & Development
Whirligig # 43
Mast - step 4

  1. The shape at the end of the groove depends on what tool you use to make it. I use a 6" diameter dado blade, which leaves a groove curving up to the mast's side surface. A router blade would leave a circular shape at the end of the groove. Whatever tool you use, you can fill the extra space with scrap wood and wood filler. The important thing is that you have a clear path 2 1/2" long where you can place the Mast Mount Tube.
  2. Note that the groove is slanted to the BACK of the mast about 1 degree. This slant gives a better appearance when the whirligig is placed on the whirligig stand.
  3. However you make the groove, you will need to cut a piece scrap wood to close the groove over the Mast Mount Tube. When you glue the scrap piece in place, put some extra glue around the Mast Mount Tube to keep it from falling out later.
  4. Trim away the excess wood.





___________________________________________________________

Chuck Dunbar's
Whirligig Design & Development
Whirligig # 43
Miscellaneous Parts

  1. Chamfer the pin ends so that they will go into their holes easily. The fit in the hole should be snug. If you have to use something hard to push the pins in, or you have to use pliers to get them out, that is the right fit. If the pins fit too loosely in the holes, bend them slightly or, using a cold chisel, whack them in the middle to widen the pin diameter. This will also bend the pins slightly.
  2. There may be a problem with the 1/4” diameter rod on the Whirligig Stand (Complete plans for the Whirligig Stand will be posted by July 31, 2009) fitting into the Mast Mount Tube. If the 1/4” diameter rod of the stand is too big to fit into the Mast Mount Tube, put the rod into the chuck of the drill press. With the drill press on its slowest speed, sand the rod until it just fits.
  3. Chamfer one end of the Counter Balance Rods to fit more easily into their holes.
  4. You will need to reduce the diameter of the Axle so that it will fit through the bearing. Put the Axle in the drill press chuck. With the drill press on its slowest speed, sand the Axle just enough for it to fit through the bearing.
___________________________________________________________

Chuck Dunbar's
Whirligig Design & Development
Whirligig # 43
Assembly


  1. Before you paint the whirligig, put it together to make certain everything fits.
  2. Put the axle into its hole in the Mast Axle Holder. Insert its retaining pin.
  3. Before attaching the Mast to the Mast Axle Holder, make a separator from scrap plastic painters' drop cloth or wax paper. Put it between the two pieces. This keeps the paint on the pieces from sticking together.
  4. With the 1 1/2" bolts, join the Mast to the Mast Axle Holder with the separator in between the two pieces. The bolt head may go on either side. Use a flat washer under the bolt head. On the other end use a flat washer, lock washer and nut. Make sure the Axle is at a 90-degree angle to the mast. There should be enough leeway in the holes to allow for this adjustment.
  5. Put a 1/4" diameter rod about 6" long into 1/4" diameter hole drilled into a scrap wood block. Clamp the block to the edge of your work surface.
  6. Put the Mast on the rod.
  7. Insert the two Counter Balance Rods in their holes. Secure them with retaining pins. Fasten the blades to their hubs with the 1" bolts. Put the bolt head against the metal blade and a washer, a lock washer and a nut on the other side.
  8. Put a half drop of light oil in the bearing race. Put the bearings in their holes.
  9. Put a Dura-Collar on the Axle, then an assembled blade and hub, then a second Dura-Collar.
  10. The blade should clear the mast by about 1/2". Tighten the setscrew in the first Dura-Collar. Push the second Dura-Collar against the bearing on the other side of the hub and tighten the setscrew.
  11. Repeat steps 7 through 9 for the second blade. About 1/2" should separate the blades when they rotate. There should be about 1/4" of Axle left beyond the last Dura-Collar.
  12. The final step is balancing. Put a small piece of tape on one hub to serve as a marker. Put two Dura-Collars on each Counter Balance Rod all the way up the rod next to the hub. In a room without drafts, spin the blade. Note where the blade comes to rest. (Think of a clock face.) Little by little adjust the location of the Dura-Collars until each blade is perfectly balanced. It will come to rest at different places. This balancing procedure can take as long as an hour. Your newly completed Whirligig #43 is finished. The blades should turn in the slightest breath of air.
  13. If the blades do not turn freely, check the following:
  14. Are the Dura-Collars too tight against the bearing?
  15. Did you put a half a drop of oil in the bearing race?
  16. Are the bearings in the hub parallel to one another?
  17. Does the Axle rub against the hub where it passes between the bearings through the hub?
___________________________________________________________

Chuck Dunbar's
Whirligig Design & Development
Whirligig #43
Painting wood parts


  1. You may paint the whirligig any color you like, but if you are putting it outside, intense colors are the most visible.
  2. Sand the wood pieces with 150 grit or 180 grit 3M Sandblaster sandpaper.
  3. Prime the wood with a good grade of white exterior latex or acrylic (water based) wood primer paint. I put on three thick coats.
  4. Then sand the paint smooth with 220 grit 3M Sandblaster sandpaper. The 3M sandpaper does not fill up with paint. After you have sanded, some of the wood may show through.
  5. Apply two more coats of the exterior paint more thinly and evenly.
  6. Sand with 320 grit 3M Sandblaster sandpaper. Avoid sanding down to the wood. If the wood shows, apply two more paint coats over the bare spots and sand.
  7. Use quality exterior gloss enamel over the primer. The color coat may be either water based or solvent-based exterior paint. I use Ronan solvent-based Bulletin colors. I apply them with a one-stroke synthetic hair brush. Whatever paint you use, follow the directions. Using solvent-based paint requires adequate ventilation.
___________________________________________________________

Chuck Dunbar's
Whirligig Design & Development
Whirligig #43
Painting aluminum and brass parts


  1. Priming brass and aluminum metals presents special problems. The following procedure works. (Go to my blog [http://dunbar.blog.com/4954759/] for a complete discussion of the problem and a solution.) For best results, allow enough time to follow the procedure without interruption. Prepare a solution of trisodium phosphate, TSP, 1 cup per gallon. Clean the metal parts with #1 steel wool. Immediately put all the aluminum or brass parts to be painted in the TSP solution. Do not put the brass and aluminum parts in the solution at the same time. Leave the parts in the TSP solution a half hour. Swish the water a few times. Rinse and dry the metal parts.
  2. Immediately, put the metal parts in a 5% solution of white vinegar (how it comes out of the bottle) for five minutes. Swish the samples a few times. Do not put the brass and aluminum parts in the vinegar at the same time. Rinse and dry the samples.
  3. Immediately, spray Rustoleum Clean Metal Primer, white or very light gray, (no product number) on all surfaces of the metal samples. Do not forget the edges. Apply two coats. Follow the directions on the spray can. I improvise a spray booth outside to spray paint the parts. I wear a half mask cartridge respirator while I paint.
  4. Sand the metal parts very lightly with 320 grit 3M Sandblaster sandpaper.
  5. Use quality exterior gloss enamel over the primer. The color coat may be either solvent-based or water-based exterior paint. If you use water-based exterior enamel, allow the Rustoleum Clean Metal Primer to cure for one week. I use Ronan solvent-based Bulletin colors. I apply them with a one-stroke synthetic hair brush. Whatever paint you use, follow the directions. Using solvent-based paint requires adequate ventilation.
___________________________________________________________


2 comments:

Whirligigs said...

Your detailed descriptions, photographs and workmanship is fantastic. You must be a draftsman and engineer. I too find that a small band saw, drill press and soldering tools are a must in order to align moving parts. I also need wood carving tools for my figures.

Ben aka whirligiger32 on youtube

Anonymous said...

Thanks Whirligiger 32. Nope, not an engineer or draftsman. I'm a picture painter, although, decades ago I got a B.S. degree in chemistry, later an MFA in painting.

You can see the art at
http://dunbar.blog.com/
and
charlesdunbarartist.com

Chuck Dunbar